Social Media and Language Democratization in Egypt

The following is a Guest Post from my good friend and a great scholar, Janine Jones, a doctoral student in modern Middle East intellectual history at The University of Texas at Austin. It stems from conversations we have had sharing the interests that cross our disciplines—language, literacies, equity, education. Among linguists, Arabic is commonly classified as a diglossic language*. In other words, written Arabic, the … Continue reading Social Media and Language Democratization in Egypt

Welcome to the United States, Developing Writers!

Although only the hardback version (a.k.a. expensive collectors’ item) of our new book, Developing Writers: Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age, shows up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble, the Buy Now and Desk Copy buttons at Open University Press, U.S.A. are now functional! (Amazon does have a Kindle version.) With Richard Andrews, Dean of Faculty and Professor of English at the Institute of Education, University of London, … Continue reading Welcome to the United States, Developing Writers!

A Digital Phenom: Increased Presence of the Past in our Lives

In the Music section of The New York Times, music critic Simon Reynolds explored how and why The Songs of Now Sound a Lot Like Then. Right in the middle of this column, Reynolds takes a stab at the larger vintage chic pop culture phenomenon and its relation to the digital age. Just something that made me go hmmmmm…. The fading of newness and nowness from … Continue reading A Digital Phenom: Increased Presence of the Past in our Lives

From Positive/Negative to Affordances/Constraints

Yesterday, the International Business Times reported on a couple of studies regarding the relationship between memory and the Internet. Like many titles, the purposefully evocative title of this article, “Google Effect: Changes to our Brains,” was misleading. Instead of “changes to the brain,” the article reported some of the new ways people use their memory capacity and use digital devices as external memory. One of … Continue reading From Positive/Negative to Affordances/Constraints

Duh, Duncan

Education is coursing through the veins of public media from Wisconsin’s attacks on unions (and Jon Stewart’s apropos responses) to Capital Hill’s review of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). And what is the sound we are hearing? Money. Money. Money. (And we aren’t talking  about this guy’s chump change.) We’re talking about the business–the big business–of education. Last week US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan took an important … Continue reading Duh, Duncan