Dummy Runs and Schooled Writing

In December I had the pleasure of joining a group of 5th graders in the high desert mountains of Utah. That week, my niece, Alaina, and her classmates had just asked their teacher if they could have time to write to children in Newtown, Connecticut after the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy. In a discussion with Alaina about how she decided what to write about, … Continue reading Dummy Runs and Schooled Writing

Duh, Duncan

Education is coursing through the veins of public media from Wisconsin’s attacks on unions (and Jon Stewart’s apropos responses) to Capital Hill’s review of No Child Left Behind (NCLB). And what is the sound we are hearing? Money. Money. Money. (And we aren’t talking  about this guy’s chump change.) We’re talking about the business–the big business–of education. Last week US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan took an important … Continue reading Duh, Duncan

The Two-Faced Coin (Part 2 of 2): Education’s Two-Face–Time

What do you think? Is it going to be heads or tails? At this moment, can you tell? What will determine on which side it will drop? A gust of wind? The momentum of the roll? (Someone with a physics degree chime in with a comment. I am sure we’d all love to know the actual factors that will contribute to the outcome.) When it comes to … Continue reading The Two-Faced Coin (Part 2 of 2): Education’s Two-Face–Time

The Two-Faced Coin (Part 1 of 2): Development and Deficit

Alright. Let’s go in. Progress, improvement and development are—in essence—the project of education. Sounds pretty good, right? But it’s not so simplistically altruistic. For one, there have been many people who have pointed out problems inherent in this project. Developing countries, for instance, can definitely benefit from implementation of certain social and physical structures that have improved the quality of life for others in the world—like … Continue reading The Two-Faced Coin (Part 1 of 2): Development and Deficit