Tag Archives: transliteracies

Exploring Mobile Dimensions with NWP

This last week Amy Stornaiuolo and I had an opportunity to meet with teachers at the Annual Meeting of the National Writing Project to discuss the mobile dimensions of contemporary literacy practices. By mobile, we mean the aspects that can move and are moved in writing. Most obviously, the list of things that move in writing includes the people who are writing, and all the old & new mobile devices we use to compose (tablets, phones, pens, notebooks, etc.). Composed messages, too, are mobile, and with networked means, their distribution can reach wide, potentially global audiences.

However, there are other aspects of writing that are similarly mobile, but less obviously so, including our passions and interests (such as an interest in language, data analytics, or an invested way of being), aspects of written products (such as genre characteristics), and writing practices (such as a particular way of revising or composing).

The mobile dimensions of writing have not traditionally received much attention in schools; however, they are important to consider if we are interested in young people’s growth and development as writers. This is particularly true when thinking about the immobilities in students’ writing, whether those are in their writing products, processes, or practices, particularly as some students’ compositions and creations are impeded differently than others–at times in inequitable and unjust ways.

A thread of this session also focused on ways to sense and trace these mobilities, and we used our work in two networks of writers to discuss these aspects through our transliteracies framework we’ve been developing with Nathan Phillips. First we mapped posts from an international network of young writers created by Amy called Write4Change, and then discussed how we might take part in some networked writing ourselves in an online professional learning opportunity for educators that Anna has been a part of called the CLMOOC (Connected Learning Massive Open Online Community).

In addition to the links available in the post and presentation above, there are some other resources that may be of interest:

An article on the mobilities of teachers’ posts in CLMOOC, called Remix as Professional Learning: Educators’ Iterative Literacy Practice in CLMOOC.

A webinar from the Connected Learning TV when we spoke with educators about possibilities of the transliteracies framework for their work with youth:


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So Many Literacies, So Little Time

The title of this post is borrowed from one of the pre-service teachers I’m working with in a Literacies and Technologies Across Disciplines course at my new institution. It’s the beginning of a new semester, and in this course that means, it’s Literacies Log time. In this assignment, I ask students to 201log their literacy activity for just an hour’s worth of time. The results are always interesting, if not mind-blowing as we consider how much of our time is spent engaging with a wide range of texts of various genres and formats mediated by a variety of technologies. As one student remarked, “It’s like we are constantly being literate. Even if you are just thinking, you are making sense of a text of some sort or another.”

literacy-logs

Above is just a smattering of the literacy practices we logged in an hour. And it got me thinking about a few things recent conversations I’ve had about literacies. For instance, we’re all (yes, I am speaking for all of ‘us’) tired of the ‘_________ literacies’ phenomenon. From visual literacies to digital literacies and fitness literacies to friendship literacies, from time to time hyphenating ‘literacies’ happens. (Heck, my work with Amy Stornaiuolo and Nathan C. Phillips is all about transliteracies.) Adding a term can help us to focus in on some aspect of literacy activity that we want to consider that may not—for one reason or another—have been foregrounded.

But it is always my hope whenever I see a ‘________ literacies’ that someday, because of the attention we give it with that prefix, that we’ll be able to talk about literacies, just literacies, and the focal aspect will be an obvious aspect to consider. And from the literacies logs turned in this year, I am even more hopeful that we’ll be able to drop some of those prefixes—like digital, visual, even trans—sooner than later. The everyday literacy practices logged were predominantly digital, involved visual modes, and a few of the students even noticed (without prompting from me) how their varied literacy practices allowed (or kept) them to be mobile across spaces and time.

So many literacies, but maybe someday…


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